Dereliction of duty

The decision by allied forces to finally draw a line in the sand and exit the 20-year war in Afghanistan was as unpalatable as it was inevitable.

The decision by allied forces to finally draw a line in the sand and exit the 20-year war in Afghanistan was as unpalatable as it was inevitable.
To prolong such a futile conflict was a waste of lives and resources.
It was the unwinnable war and the speed with which the Taliban swept across the country after the announcement showed just how little had been achieved in the decades spent training and arming the government forces.
Once again the awesome might of the US military and its allies has been humbled by a seemingly ragtag bunch of fighters.
It just goes to prove that might is not always right.
The lack of military intelligence surrounding the decision to abandon the country is staggering.
Those in authority must have understood the precarious situation on the ground, how powerful and organised the enemy had become and the brittle nature of the defending government forces.
For those signals to be either ignored or unseen is a dereliction of duty in the extreme.
The pullout has all the hallmarks of a decision made in haste and, although a perfect result to such complex logistical challenges is impossible to achieve, it is the locals left behind who will suffer the most.
What a crying shame the schools and hospitals built by allied forces will never achieve their aims.
Women in Afghanistan – given a brief glimpse of a better life for a single generation – will never achieve their full potential.
It is back to the stone age for many.
The war began all those years ago with high ideals to prevent the development of a dangerous terrorist enclave.
That logic may have been sound in the wake of the attacks on the US in 2001 but it evolved into trying to establish a new system of government for a people to whom democracy was a relatively alien concept.
There are undemocratic and corrupt nations all over the world but that isn’t a reason to be at war with them.
War is always cruel and Australia is better off out of Afghanistan than in it.
It’s just the assistance given to those who helped us along the way has been short of the ideals on which Australia prides itself.